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Ang aming pastora: Perceptions of the United Church of Christ in the Philippines' members on women pastors' communicator styles and effectiveness

Reglos, Mary Grace A. (2014). Ang aming pastora: Perceptions of the United Church of Christ in the Philippines’ members on women pastors’ communicator styles and effectiveness, Unpublished Undergraduate Thesis, University of the Philippines College of Mass Communication.


The study delved into how male and female church members perceive women pastors’ communicator styles and effectiveness. Anchored on the Role Congruity Theory, the study sought to identify whether women pastors’ communication style would be congruent with the role expectations as postulated by the theory, i.e. women are expected to perform communal communication styles while men are expected to perform agentic communicator styles. Since the study focused on women communicators, particularly women pastors who perform male-typed work in a male-dominated society, it aimed to determine the congruency or incongruency of communication styles to the role expectations through perceived communication style and communicator effectiveness.

Research was done through random sampling survey. Respondents were grouped according to sex. Findings revealed that both male and female church members see that women pastors exhibit communal communication styles, specifically, Attached, Nurturant, and Sensitive styles. Meanwhile, male church members see that women pastors display Attached, Attentive, and Sensitive communication styles while female church members, see that women pastors display Attached, Nurturant, and Sensitive communication styles. Findings also uncovered that church members perceive women pastors with communal communication styles as effective communicators. The results are therefore consistent with the premise of the Role Congruity Theory.

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