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BEAT-ING THE GAME: THE LOOMING LEGITIMACY OF THE VIDEOGAME BEAT
AN ANALYSIS OF HOW THE JOURNALISM INDUSTRY REGARDS GAMING AS A LEGITIMATE SECTION

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to determine the possibility of establishing a section in the newspaper devoted to videogames. It analyzed the current state of videogame journalism in the country. It looked at the challenges facing the gaming beat then went on to determine the reaction of the public to the suggested implementation of a videogame section. Using interviews, a focus group discussion, and a survey, the study was able to find out that although the conception of a videogame section seems warranted, the state of local gaming and local journalism is not yet ready for such a section.

In journalism, gaming is seen as a niche field, an unimportant section which is deemed unnecessary, unlike “hard” news. Also, the prevalence of online as the de-facto source of gaming news hinders the growth of such a section. Added to the fact that much of the local gaming scene is rooted in piracy, support from leading game companies is faint, further impeding access to gaming news. And while the people’s reaction to the idea of a videogame section is positive, the issue of content and practicality is still a factor considered by those who are interested in a videogame section.

Guevara, O. & Roque, J. E. (2010). Beat-ing the Game: The Looming Legitimacy of the Videogame Beat, Unpublished Undergraduate Dissertation, University of the Philipines College of Mass Communication.

View Thesis in flipbook: Legitimacy of the Videogame (UP Webmail Account required)

Subject Index: Journalism, Video games

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