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Nationalism 2.0 Gender and Nationalism Mediated in the Use of Internet Tools of GABRIELA USA

ABSTRACT

Matsuzawa, M.C. (2010). Nationalism 2.0: Gender and nationalism mediated in the use of Internet tools of GABRIELA USA, Unpublished Thesis, University of the Philippines College of Mass Communication.

This study examined how a notion of nationalism that transcends traditional concepts on citizenship and allegiance can be possible through the notions of feminist sisterhood and international solidarity. Looking into the unique strand of feminism present in the Philippine women‘s movement, this research zoomed in on the role that the New Media play in the process, with its ability to host claims and form networks.

This research used a historical perspective to see how history contributed to the Philippine women's movement and the current framework of GABRIELA and its eventual expansion to the USA. This research also looked into the notion of nationalism advanced by the said organization and its mediation through the Internet tools they use. Given the opportunities opened by New Media in doing organizing work and hosting claims, this research discusses how the strand of activism of GABRIELA translates on their online presence.

With the case of GABRIELA in the USA, which is miles away from the Philippines, and with membership that include second to third generation migrants, this study tries to examine how the organization‘s political framework makes possible a sisterhood that allows nationalism with an international solidarity aspect. The analysis was done through the use of methodological triangulation with a predominantly qualitative character. Research instruments used involved Focus Interviews on members of the organization and Content Analysis of their web site.

View Thesis

Subject Index: Nationalism, Mass media, Feminism--Philippines, Internet, Sisterhoods, Solidarity

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