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ABSTRACT

On February 25, 2011, a Filipino-Canadian named Mikey Bustos uploaded on YouTube a video entitled Filipino Tutorial Accent, a video about the Filipinos’ supposed accent when speaking English. The video went viral over the Internet and became an instant hit especially among Filipinos. Soon, the video was followed by a series of other Filipino tutorial videos all created and uploaded by Mikey Bustos. His Filipino tutorial series acquired a huge following particularly from Filipino fans.

This audience reception study gave light to how selected U.P. Diliman undergraduate students received Mikey Bustos’ representation of the Filipino culture through his Filipino tutorial videos. Stuart Hall’s Encoding–Decoding model and James Carey’s Ritual Perspective of Communication were used as frameworks for the study. To find out how the participants decoded various elements of the videos, a series of focus interviews were conducted.

The selected U.P. Diliman undergraduate students received the representation of the Pinoy culture in various ways. Although the participants agreed that the videos do reflect the Filipino culture, they still interpreted the tutorials’ functions in several ways: 1) promotion of the Filipino culture and values; 2) Mikey Bustos’ way of self-expression and entertainment; 3) defense of the Filipino culture from detractors; 4) or a mockery of the Pinoy culture.

Prior to their exposure to the Filipino tutorial videos, the participants already possessed self-constructed nationalism, for nationalism is a sentiment; it can be created at will. The national pride that the participants gained added to their already existing sense of nationalism.


Dumpit, C.L. (2012). ‘Operation Pinoy World Domination’: U.P. Diliman Undergraduate Students’ Reception of Mikey Bustos’ Filipino Tutorial Videos. Unpublished Undergraduate Thesis, University of the Philippines, College of Mass Communication

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