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The Family That Rules Together Stays Forever: An Investigative Study on Congress' Failure to Pass Anti-Political Dynasty Bills


Bantilan, F. & Mendoza, S. (2011). The family that rules together stays forever: An investigative study on Congress’ failure to pass anti-political dynasty bills, Unpublished Undergraduate Thesis, University of the Philippines College of Mass Communication.


This study investigated the Philippine Congress’ failure to pass the constitutionally mandated anti-political dynasty bills since 1987. Using a framework based on the Critical Legal Studies Movement, Strategic Politician Model and Public Choice Theory, the study analyzed the legislative process, family backgrounds and motivations of lawmakers who influence the enactment of such bills. The researchers employed qualitative methods such as textual analysis, archival research, focus and key informant interviews, and review of secondary data. The investigation revealed that since the Ninth Congress, majority of the membership of the Senate and House of Representatives come from political dynasties. The study concluded that anti-political dynasty bills will never get passed as long as these clans dominate Congress to protect their own interests. As political analysts and even the bills’ authors expressed their hopelessness on the anti-dynasty legislation, they suggested other courses of action to solve the dynasty problem. These include constitutional amendment, people’s initiative, political party reform and electorate’s education. The findings of this study were journalistically written in a two-part discussion and accompanied by a CD containing supplementary matrices.


Subject Index: Anti-Political Dynasty Bills, Political Dynasties

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