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ABSTRACT

This phenomenological study aims to determine how endorsing products affects the credibility of the newscaster and if the newscaster’s credibility is also commodified in doing these endorsements. In the study, the Source Credibility theory was utilized in determining the credibility of the newscasters’ image. The theory of Political Economy was also used in order to determine whether the newscaster’s credibility was commodified in doing product endorsements. A survey was conducted among participants from three sectors: the students, the middle class, and the masa or the lower economic strata to be able to show the different points of view of the audience. In-depth interviews with experts from the television and advertising industries were also conducted to determine the ethical issues and motives involved in the product endorsement of newscasters. The results show that the audience has a positive reaction to seeing newscasters doing product endorsements and they still perceived them as credible. It can be concluded that these commercials are indeed advantageous to the credibility of the newscaster.

However, with regard to the effectivity of the newscaster as an endorser, the results show that even if the respondents find the newscaster credible, it does not affect their decision to purchase the product. Instead, the respondents would primarily consider the quality of the product itself. The major implication of the study is that the network itself still considers the phenomenon of newscasters doing commercials as an unresolved issue and that a better standard of ethical practice should be established within the institution itself.

Recommendations for the study would be to conduct more interviews of newscasters to be able to gather sufficient data to further support the findings of the study that advertisers do have undue influence on the newscast. A study focused on the networks that allow newscasters to do product endorsements and their motives in doing so can also be done. This can help determine if the phenomenon of newscasters doing product endorsements will still persist in the future.

View Thesis in flipbook: Credibility of Newscasters (UP Webmail Account required)

Subject Index: Credibility, Television journalists, Endorsements in advertising

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