Difference between revisions of "The University in Relation to Political Beliefs: Family Communication Dynamics of Undergraduate Metro Manila University Students Whose Political Beliefs Differ from Those of Their Parents"

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Our study explored how undergraduate students develop political beliefs different from those of their parents, and how these students communicate their political opinions to them. We argue that university students experience changes on their political opinions as they adapt to the university life, since the identities of these students also shift as they adapt their respective universities’ cultures (Yarbrough & Brown, 2003). Due to the polarizing nature of political discussions, we further stipulate that certain tensions—or relational dialectics (Baxter & Montgomery, 1996)— become apparent in the interpersonal relationship between the university student and their parents. A total of 24 interviews with senior high school and university students planning to study or are currently studying in Polytechnic University of the Philippines, University of the Philippines Diliman, and University of Santo Tomas was conducted. Findings from the interviews reveal that students have more opportunities to explore and develop political opinion during their university years, allowing them to develop political opinions that their parents do not share. Furthermore, power dynamics and Filipino communicative behavior appear to have a significant influence on parent-student dynamics when it comes to discussing political issues.
 
Our study explored how undergraduate students develop political beliefs different from those of their parents, and how these students communicate their political opinions to them. We argue that university students experience changes on their political opinions as they adapt to the university life, since the identities of these students also shift as they adapt their respective universities’ cultures (Yarbrough & Brown, 2003). Due to the polarizing nature of political discussions, we further stipulate that certain tensions—or relational dialectics (Baxter & Montgomery, 1996)— become apparent in the interpersonal relationship between the university student and their parents. A total of 24 interviews with senior high school and university students planning to study or are currently studying in Polytechnic University of the Philippines, University of the Philippines Diliman, and University of Santo Tomas was conducted. Findings from the interviews reveal that students have more opportunities to explore and develop political opinion during their university years, allowing them to develop political opinions that their parents do not share. Furthermore, power dynamics and Filipino communicative behavior appear to have a significant influence on parent-student dynamics when it comes to discussing political issues.
  
[http://iskwiki.upd.edu.ph/flipbook/viewer/?fb=2014-43003-COMM-RES View Thesis]
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[http://iskwiki.upd.edu.ph/flipbook/viewer/?fb=2014-43003-ThesisMa View Thesis]
  
 
[[Category:Theses]][[Category:CMC Thesis]][[Category:Department of Communication Research Thesis]][[Category:2019 Thesis]][[Category:Thesis--Political Communication]][[Category:Thesis--Family Communication]]
 
[[Category:Theses]][[Category:CMC Thesis]][[Category:Department of Communication Research Thesis]][[Category:2019 Thesis]][[Category:Thesis--Political Communication]][[Category:Thesis--Family Communication]]

Latest revision as of 11:12, 23 July 2020

The University in Relation to Political Beliefs: Family Communication Dynamics of Undergraduate Metro Manila University Students Whose Political Beliefs Differ from Those of Their Parents

Salazar, B. S. M., & Cruz, J. L. F. (2019). The University in Relation to Political Beliefs: Family Communication Dynamics of Undergraduate Metro Manila University Students Whose Political Beliefs Differ from Those of Their Parents (Unpublished undergraduate thesis). University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines.

Our study explored how undergraduate students develop political beliefs different from those of their parents, and how these students communicate their political opinions to them. We argue that university students experience changes on their political opinions as they adapt to the university life, since the identities of these students also shift as they adapt their respective universities’ cultures (Yarbrough & Brown, 2003). Due to the polarizing nature of political discussions, we further stipulate that certain tensions—or relational dialectics (Baxter & Montgomery, 1996)— become apparent in the interpersonal relationship between the university student and their parents. A total of 24 interviews with senior high school and university students planning to study or are currently studying in Polytechnic University of the Philippines, University of the Philippines Diliman, and University of Santo Tomas was conducted. Findings from the interviews reveal that students have more opportunities to explore and develop political opinion during their university years, allowing them to develop political opinions that their parents do not share. Furthermore, power dynamics and Filipino communicative behavior appear to have a significant influence on parent-student dynamics when it comes to discussing political issues.

View Thesis